Month: March 2019


Home burglars reveal the tricks of the trade

How do home burglars choose a home to rob? What makes it easier or harder for them to break into a home? What can homeowners do to ensure their home is not a target? To learn the answers to these questions, Portland Oregon KGW TV’s investigative team sent letters to inmates currently serving time for burglary in the Oregon Department of Corrections. Inmates were surveyed anonymously about how they broke in, when the crime occurred and what they were looking for. See: We asked 86 burglars how they broke into homes

Here’s an eye-opening video as a KGW reporter rides around a neighborhood with a former home burglar who talks about how he cased homes and commit robberies.

The linked article above is also worth reading. When asked “What is the one thing homeowners can do to avoid being burglarized?”: “Burglars suggest homeowners make their property visible with good lighting and trimmed bushes and trees. You should get to know your neighbors and alert police if you see anything suspicious.”

  • “In my opinion, I think homeowners should always leave a TV or radio on,” said one inmate.
  • “Get a camera and make it visible!” wrote another.
  • “Put bars on your windows and doors, get an alarm, keep an extra car in the driveway, keep lights, TVs and radios on when you leave your home,” read one questionnaire.
  • “Home alarm, know your neighbor so they can report suspicious people around the neighborhood,” said a burglar.

More secrets from robbers

For another brief video and tips from burglars see How do you prevent a burglary? Convicted thieves tell all – KSL in Salt Lake City.

We previously featured a post on Burglar Secrets: Expert advice on how to protect your home.. While links to the original article we cited are no longer operational, we excerpted several tips in the post. Among them,  mistakes that burglars said people often make:

  • Bragging about valuables, new purchases
  • Leaving doors and windows unlocked or garage doors open
  • Failing to enable security systems
  • Leaving valuables visible through windows
  • Leaving valuable things like bikes and riding mowers laying about in the yard
  • Having uncovered windows that allow views into the home

Talk to your insurance agent

Your home insurance company might also have good information about keeping your home safe. And if you have home security systems, you may earn a discount on your insurance policy – talk this over with your independent insurance agent.

Reprinted from Renaissance Alliance – no usage without permission.

Tips for driving safely around large commercial vehicles

Any time you are driving your car on the highway or on your city and town roads, you are navigating a vehicle that weighs about 5,000 pounds, while sharing the road with 12.5 million giant commercial vehicles. A fully loaded bus can weigh 30,000 to 44,000 pounds, according to the American Public Transportation Association. And according to The Truckers’ Report, the legal weight for an eighteen wheeler is 80,000 lbs. Plus, factor in any oversize or overweight permits. The length of time to stop an eighteen wheeler is 40% greater than that of an automobile.

How confident are you about your driving skills? Having a collision with any other vehicle is a serious matter, but the stakes are even higher when it comes to collision with a 30 or 40 ton vehicle! There are no mere fender benders in an accident pitting your car against this weight class.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has issued Our Roads, Our Safety, a national safety campaign shaped to raise awareness about sharing the road safely with large trucks and buses. They offer Tips for Passenger Vehicle Drivers, as well as Tips for Bicyclists and Pedestrians, both of which are worth checking out. We found the infographics that illustrate the driver tip list particularly helpful and have reprinted them below. They offer useful visual guides for blind spots and space considerations when driving around large commercial vehicles.

diagram showing how to give trucks extra turning space

diagram showing the stopping distance for large vehicles

Reprinted from Renaissance Alliance – no usage without permission.

Fraud alert: This is (not) the government calling

Think you are too smart to fall for phone scams? Not so fast. In 2018, American consumers lost more than $488 million to a type of fraud that the Federal Trade Commission (FRC) calls “imposter scams.”

One particularly common and effective type of imposter scam is the fraudster posing as a government official. In fact, the FTC says that fake government calls now top the list of imposter scams. We’ve frequently posted about IRS tax season scams. In the Washington Post, Michelle Singletary warns that the latest hoax calls  tell you that your Social Security number is being suspended. There re several variations to the scam, often elaborate stories about how your Social Security number turned up in crimes.  The end goal is to either get you to reveal your number or to pay a fee to “reinstate it.” Some scenarios even threaten arrest. She quotes an FTC official:

“If you get a call out of the blue from someone claiming to be from a government agency like the Social Security Administration or IRS asking you for personal information or money, it’s a scam,” said Andrew Smith, director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection.

Check out the tips and advice she offers for how to spot and avoid this scam. And here’s an FTC infographic for a typical telephone IRS scam – it’s a pattern that is common for SS# and other governmental scams, too.

IRS phone scam infographic

Reprinted from Renaissance Alliance – no usage without permission.

Retired car features that people miss

Hey – why doesn’t my car turn signal make a sound anymore? Audible turn signals are just one of the new car features you may overlook on a test drive, but later look back on nostalgically. New car advances are great – we’re all driving safer, more fuel efficient vehicles than our parents did – or even than we did, a decade ago. Safety features like air bags, seat belts, anti-lock brakes, cars designed to hold up under crash criteria, rear cameras and other innovations are now fairly standard in new cars. But despite the innovation, many car buyers wax nostalgic for standard features that have all but disappeared or are on the way out. One of the most surprising car features that is going the way of the dinosaurs in many new cars are spare tires, a topic we’ve discussed before (See Does your new car have a spare tire? Don’t count on it!)

AAA features a fun article that talks about 10 Car Features That No Longer Exist in New Vehicles. Some features like front bench seats have been gone or scarce for so long that it’s doubtful if most young people even recall them. Others, like the disappearance of ashtrays, are largely a feature of changing consumer habits. Check out the list – hand-cranked windows, audible turn signals, simple controls and more. Plus, the comments are fun – people list even more bygone favorite features. The most frequently mentioned missing convenience is a Hi/Lo foot-operated dimmer switch that used to be on the floor of the car. Other people said they miss clutches, air vents in the floor, light bulbs that are easy to replace and rear windows that go all the way down. And even though the older, heavier cars were less safe, many people miss the large bodies and the heft and feeling of security that metal and steel offered.

Before you get too sad about bygone Happy Days-era car features, check out this list of what you can look forward to for the future. Consumer Reports offers a preview of up-and-coming vehicle features: Must-Have Features to Get in Your Next New Car, ranging from safety features to convenience. They break both categories down into “must have” and “nice to have” features, as well as a few that they suggest taking a pass on. Here’s their clip on some of the safety features in action.

Remember, whether you are looking for auto insurance  for a vintage classic car or a high-tech new vehicle with all the bells and whistles, your local independent insurance agent can scour the market for the best options.

Reprinted from Renaissance Alliance – no usage without permission.

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